Health

1 2 3 6

Pin It

“Life is meant to be enjoyed. Sure, I agree with this statement (as many of us would) but the problem is this is used to justify all kinds of crappy behavior. Might as well scarf down those Doritos and Twinkies, because hey, life is meant to be enjoyed, right? No. You can do without junk food and still enjoy life. You can exercise and enjoy it. You can give up pretty much anything and still enjoy life, if you learn to see almost any activity as enjoyable.” ~ Leo Babauta, Blog

Pin It

Savor: Mindful Eating, Mindful Life

By Thích Nhất Hạnh, Lilian Cheung

Buy Savor from Amazon!

Buy from Amazon!

Post(s) Inspired by this Book:  Savor Each Bite: Eating Mindfully in a World of Rush and Distractions.  ///  Chef Sati Invites You to Dinner – An Example in Eating Mindfully  ///  An Apple Meditation

Book Overview:  Common sense tells us that to lose weight, we must eat less and exercise more. But somehow we get stalled. We start on a weight-loss program with good intentions but cannot stay on track. Neither the countless fad diets, nor the annual spending of $50 billion on weight loss helps us feel better or lose weight.

Too many of us are in a cycle of shame and guilt. We spend countless hours worrying about what we ate or if we exercised enough, blaming ourselves for actions that we can’t undo. We are stuck in the past and unable to live in the present—that moment in which we do have the power to make changes in our lives.

With Savor, world-renowned Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh and Harvard nutritionist Dr. Lilian Cheung show us how to end our struggles with weight once and for all.

Continue reading

Savor Each Bite: Eating Mindfully in a World of Rush and Distractions.

Pin It

When Was the Last Time You Really Stopped and Looked at the Food that was Right in Front of You?

When hunger strikes, usually our patience dwindles.  We feel our stomach twist and turn and rumble and moan so that it may be filled again – and we respond by trying to get food to it as fast as possible.  When we are finally able to get a meal, it isn’t long until it all vanishes from our plate – right before our eyes - and typically re-appears somewhere in the region of our stomach…  How that happens exactly?  Most of us don’t remember.

In his book Savor, Thich Nhat Hanh discusses the importance of being mindful while eating (and while doing most anything in life) so that a person may attain a healthier weight and a more fulfilling lifestyle.  One of the central practices he talks about is the idea of slowing down and being more present before, during, and after every meal. Continue reading

Pin It

“When practiced to its fullest, mindful eating turns a simple meal into a spiritual experience, giving us a deep appreciation of all that went into the meal’s creation as well a deep understanding of the relationship between the food on our table, our own health, and our planet’s health.” ~ Thich Nhat Hanh, Savor

Pin It

“As a population, if a large number of people make even small moves to eat less meat and more plant-based foods, the livestock industry will shrink. Over time, farmers will find other crops to support their livelihoods. Through such collective awakening we can make a difference in our world.” ~ Thich Nhat Hanh, Savor

An Apple Meditation

Pin It

An Apple Meditation by Thich Nhat Hanh

Take an apple out of your refrigerator. Any apple will do. Wash it. Dry it. Before taking a bite, pause for a moment. Look at the apple in your palm and ask yourself: When I eat an apple, am I really enjoying eating it? Or, am I so pre-occupied with other thoughts that I miss the delights that the apple offers me?

If you are like most of us, you answer “yes” to the second question much more often than the first. For most of our lives, we have eaten apple after apple without giving it a second thought. Yet in this mindless way of eating, we have denied ourselves the many delights present in the simple act of eating an apple. Why do that, especially when it is so easy to truly enjoy the apple?

Continue reading

Pin It

“Dealing with our overweight – or with any of our life’s difficulties, for that matter – is not a battle to be fought. Instead, we must learn how to make friends with our hardships and challenges. They are there to help us; they are natural opportunities for deeper understanding and transformation, brining us more joy and peace as we learn to work with them.” ~ Thich Nhat Hanh, Savor

1 2 3 6